Grain

Beers

Dortmunder

Well-balanced, smooth and refreshing, Dortmunders tend to be stronger and fuller than other pale lagers or Munich helles styles. They may also be a shade darker and a touch hoppier. The style originates from the city of Dortmund in northern Germany. Dortmunder Export came about during the industrial revolution, when Dortmund was the center of the coal and steel industries and the swelling population needed a hearty and sustaining brew. The “export” appendage refers to the fact that Dortmunder beers were “exported” to surrounding regions. Today the term Dortmunder now widely refers to stronger lagers brewed for export, though not necessarily from Dortmund.
Beers

Doppelbock

This is a subcategory of the bock style. Doppelbocks are extra strong, rich and weighty lagers characterized by an intense malty sweetness with a note of hop bitterness to balance the sweetness. Color can vary from full amber to dark brown, and alcohol levels are potently high, typically 7-8 percent ABV. Doppelbocks were first brewed in the 17th century by the Paulaner monks in Munich. At the time, it was intended to be consumed as “liquid bread” during Lent. Most Bavarian examples end in thesuffix “–ator,” in deference to the first commercial example, which was named Salvator (savior) by the Paulaner brewers.
Beers

Amber Lager

Amber lagers are a vaguely defined style of lager much favored by U.S. lager brewers. They are darker in color, anywhere from amber- to copper-hued, and generally more fully flavored than a standard pale lager. Caramel malt flavors are typical, and hopping levels vary considerably from one brewery to the next, though they are frequently hoppier than the true Vienna lager styles on which they are loosely based. Alcohol levels are generally a maximum of 5 percent ABV.
Full PintsHistory

Heritage Breweries

“Brewing since 1907.” For an industry that spends millions to emphasize the freshness of its product, there’s still some attention

Buyer's Guide for Beer Lovers

Lagers

Our most recent lager tasting of the World Beer Championships brought forth a host of fine lagers from around the

Beers

Gluten-Free Lager

Specialty Beer is, practically speaking, a catchall tasting for beers that don't fit neatly in an existing category. However, if enthusiasm for a particular innovation grows, an emerging style may come to warrant its own, new category, as was the case for the Imperial IPA or Barrel-Aged categories. Simply put, Specialty Beers may be flavored with or affected by unusual ingredients (ginger, chipotle peppers) or fermentation agents (Brettanomyces, Lactobacillus), or brewed with unusual fermentables (buckwheat, sweet potatoes, maple syrup). In addition, the base beer may be related to almost any classic beer style. Given the variation possible in this category, there are no established standards for appearance, aroma or flavor. Instead, judges look for a pleasing combination of the beer’s elements, and overall drinkability.
Beers

Flemish-Style Brown Ale

Specialty Beer is, practically speaking, a catchall tasting for beers that don't fit neatly in an existing category. However, if enthusiasm for a particular innovation grows, an emerging style may come to warrant its own, new category, as was the case for the Imperial IPA or Barrel-Aged categories. Simply put, Specialty Beers may be flavored with or affected by unusual ingredients (ginger, chipotle peppers) or fermentation agents (Brettanomyces, Lactobacillus), or brewed with unusual fermentables (buckwheat, sweet potatoes, maple syrup). In addition, the base beer may be related to almost any classic beer style. Given the variation possible in this category, there are no established standards for appearance, aroma or flavor. Instead, judges look for a pleasing combination of the beer’s elements, and overall drinkability.
Beers

Flavored Specialty Ale

Turning wheat beer into a cocktail has precedent in Europe, where alcoholic cordials or fruit syrups can be used to help beer slide down more easily. Flavored wheat ales are an increasingly popular specialty category, covering a number of flavoring options that brewers have adopted, particularly in the United States, the home of “throw-the-rule-book-away” hybrid beer styles. The two most significant additives are fruit and honey, usually employed separately. Raspberry is a common choice of fruit to flavor these styles and the best examples have faithful fruit essence and avoid any sweet cloying character. Honey can add richness to the palate and give a hint of sweetness. Herbs and spices are also encountered, but the possibilities are endless.
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