gueuze

Brewing Features

Blended to Perfection

Jason Perkins and Rob Tod of Allagash Brewing with Vinnie Cilurzo of Russian River Brewing Co. (Photo courtesy Allagash Brewing)

CultureFull Pints

Old and Out-of-the-Way

While nobody knows the exact percentage, nearly all of the beer brewed worldwide should be enjoyed when it’s as fresh

Beers

Lambic Gueuze

Lambic beers are perhaps the most individualistic style of beer in the world. Lambics are produced in tiny quantities immediately south of the Belgian capital, Brussels. Lambic brewers use native wild yeasts in the open-air fermentation process to produce these specialties. This unusual fermentation, in conjunction with extended aging in oak barrels, imparts a unique vinous character with a refreshing sourness and astonishing complexity. Lambics labeled as gueuze are a blend of young and old beers. Such blending results in a sharp champagne-like effervescence and tart, toasty flavors. Those labeled as faro have had sugar, caramel or molasses added in order to impart a note of sweetness. Lambic beers, however, are more often seen in the United States when they have been flavored with fruits. Kriek (cherry) and framboise (raspberry) are the most popular and traditional fruits employed. Other exotic fruits are widely used in juice form in the more commercial examples of lambic beer, much to the consternation of purist connoisseurs.
Beers

Gueuze Lambic

Includes young lambics, gueuze lambic, fruit lambic, faro. Lambic beers are perhaps the most individualistic style of beer in the world. Lambics are produced in tiny quantities immediately south of the Belgian capital, Brussels. Lambic brewers use native wild yeasts in the open-air fermentation process to produce these specialties. This unusual fermentation, in conjunction with extended aging in oak barrels, imparts a unique vinous character with a refreshing sourness and astonishing complexity. Lambics labeled as gueuze are a blend of young and old beers. Such blending results in a sharp champagne-like effervescence and tart, toasty flavors. Those labeled as faro have had sugar, caramel or molasses added in order to impart a note of sweetness. Lambic beers, however, are more often seen in the United States when they have been flavored with fruits. Kriek (cherry) and framboise (raspberry) are the most popular and traditional fruits employed. Other exotic fruits are widely used in juice form in the more commercial examples of lambic beer, much to the consternation of purist connoisseurs.
Full PintsStylistically Speaking

Lambic

Belgium is synonymous with brewing eccentricity and whimsy―its brewers’ penchant for unusual ingredients, methods and historical usage is still very

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