Mild

Beers

Pilsner

Pilsner styles of beer originated in Bohemia in the Czech Republic. They are medium- to medium-full-bodied and are characterized by high carbonation and tangy Czech varieties of hops that impart floral aromas and a crisp, bitter finish. The hallmark of a fresh pilsner is the dense, white head. The alcohol levels must be such as to give a rounded mouthfeel, typically around 5 percent ABV. Classic pilsners are thoroughly refresh ing, but they are delicate and must be fresh to show their best. Few beers are as disappointing to the beer lover as a stale pilsner. German pilsner styles are similar, though often slightly lighter in body and color. Great pilsners are technically difficult to make and relatively expensive to produce.
Beers

Pale Lager

Pale lagers are the standard international beer style, as personified by products from Miller to Heineken. This style is the generic spinoff of the pilsner style. Pale lagers are generally light- to medium-bodied with a light-to-medium hop impression and a clean, crisp malt character. Quality, from a flavor point of view, is very variable within this style, and many examples use a proportion of non-malt additives such as rice or corn. Alcohol content is typically between 3.5-5 percent ABV, with the upper end of the range being preferable if one is to get a true lager mouthfeel.
Beers

Eisbock

94 Capital Eisphyre, Capital Brewery (WI). 9.8% ABV (3/10) Deep copper color. Rich brown sugar, dried fruit, and praline aromas

Beers

Dortmunder

Well-balanced, smooth and refreshing, Dortmunders tend to be stronger and fuller than other pale lagers or Munich helles styles. They may also be a shade darker and a touch hoppier. The style originates from the city of Dortmund in northern Germany. Dortmunder Export came about during the industrial revolution, when Dortmund was the center of the coal and steel industries and the swelling population needed a hearty and sustaining brew. The “export” appendage refers to the fact that Dortmunder beers were “exported” to surrounding regions. Today the term Dortmunder now widely refers to stronger lagers brewed for export, though not necessarily from Dortmund.
Beers

Dark Lager

Dunkel is the original style of lager, serving as the forerunner to the pale lagers of today. They originated in and around Bavaria, and are widely brewed both there and around the world. This is often what average consumers are referring to when they think of dark beer. At their best, these beers combine the dryish chocolate or licorice notes associated with the use of dark roasted malts and the roundness and crisp character of a lager. Examples brewed in and around Munich tend to be a little fuller-bodied and sometimes have a hint of bready sweetness to the palate, a characteristic of the typical Bavarian malts used.
Beers

Bock

Bocks are a specific type of strong lager historically associated with Germany and specifically the town of Einbeck. These beers range from pale to deep amber tones, and feature a decided sweetness on the palate. Bock styles are an exposition of malty sweetness that is classically associated with the character and flavor of Bavarian malt. Alcohol levels are quite potent, typically 5-6 percent ABV. Hop aromas are generally low, though hop bitterness can serve as a balancing factor against the malt sweetness. Many of these beers’ names or labels feature some reference to a goat. ␣is is a play on words, in that the word “bock” also refers to a male goat in the German language. Many brewers choose to craft these beers for consumption in the spring (often called Maibock) or winter, when their warmth can be fully appreciated.
Beers

Black Beer

Originally brewed in Thuringia, a state in eastern Germany, these lager-style brews were known to be darker than their Munich counterparts. Often relatively full-bodied, rarely under 5 percent ABV, these beers classically feature a bitter chocolate, roasted malt note and a rounded character. Hop accents are generally low. This obscure style is made in small quantities by all of Japan’s major brewers. Schwarz beers are not often attempted by U.S. craft brewers.
CultureSidebars

McMedalists

How good is the beer coming out of chain brewpubs? Pretty good if the 2011 Great American Beer Festival results

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